My name is Ash from New Orleans

<3 NOLA <3


Here are some things I like!

10:54   4-23-14   5,879 notes

(Source: pinatasmashing, via ifig)

10:25   4-23-14   26 notes

“Well, let me just put a stop to this shit right now. You can give me gold-plated day care and an awesome public school right on the street corner and start paying me 15% more at work, and I still do not want a baby. I don’t particularly like babies. They are loud and smelly and, above all other things, demanding. No matter how much free day care you throw at women, babies are still time-sucking monsters with their constant neediness. No matter how flexible you make my work schedule, my entire life would be overturned by a baby. I like my life how it is, with my ability to do what I want when I want without having to arrange for a babysitter. I like being able to watch True Detective right now and not wait until baby is in bed. I like sex in any room of the house I please. I don’t want a baby. I’ve heard your pro-baby arguments. Glad those work for you, but they are unconvincing to me. Nothing will make me want a baby.

And don’t float “adoption” as an answer. Adoption? Fuck you, seriously. I am not turning my body over for nine months of gaining weight and puking and being tired and suffering and not being able to sleep on my side and going to the hospital for a bout of misery and pain so that some couple I don’t know and probably don’t even like can have a baby. I don’t owe that couple a free couch to sleep on while they come to my city to check out the local orphans, so I sure as shit don’t own them my body. I like drinking alcohol and eating soft cheese. I like not having a giant growth protruding out of my stomach. I hate hospitals and like not having stretch marks. We don’t even force men to donate sperm—a largely pleasurable activity with no physical cost—so forcing women to donate babies is reprehensible.”

The Real Debate Isn’t About “Life” But About What We Expect Of Women | The Raw Story (via brutereason)

"So, reading those three paragraphs above? I bet at some point you recoiled a bit, even if you don’t want to have recoiled a bit.  Don’t I sound selfishHedonistic? Isn’t there something very unfeminine about my bluntness here? Hell, I’m performing against gender norms so hard that even I recoil a little.

This is actually what I think, and I feel zero guilt about it, but I know that saying so out loud will cause people to want to hit me with the Bad Woman ruler, and that causes a little dread. Why do we feel this way?

What kind of training and socialization did we receive that made us think there’s something terribly wrong about a woman who is hurting no one and is actually pretty nice but wants what she wants in her private life and doesn’t apologize about it? Is there a reason that we should bully women into pretending that they’re more interested in being selfless and eternally nurturing than they actually are, even at great cost to themselves?”

(via voicesforchoices)

(via mgatsby)

9:56   4-23-14   5,649 notes

paleoillustration:

Prehistoric giraffids by Willem van der Merwe

Bramatherium, Shansitherium, and Sivatherium giganteum

(via wild-cosmia)

9:27   4-23-14   1,192 notes

(Source: zenigata, via tampaxsuperstar)

8:58   4-23-14   4,870 notes

rigisart:

more fluff to your dash~

(via bathe-the-whales)

8:29   4-23-14   1,510 notes

jenrichardsart:

Keiko wasn’t the whale that sparked my interest in orcas – that happened before Free Willy came out – but he was the one whose story I followed very closely for almost a decade. I had half a dozen VHS tapes on which I’d record anything concerning orcas that would come up on TV, whether it was a documentary, a news clip, or a film snippet; folders were packed with newspaper clippings and magazine articles. At the time, most of that news coverage was of Keiko’s extensive rehabilitation and release. It was easy to fall in love with this huge, endearing animal whose life became far more fascinating than a wistful movie plot. Like so many others around the world, I felt like I was with Keiko for every challenge and success along his journey: every transfer, every “ocean walk,” every opportunity to interact with his own species, every return to humans. Though I can’t begin to imagine the heartbreak those that worked with him felt when he died, I was devastated. That was the 12th December 2003. I painted a picture of him a few days later. (I’ve unfortunately lost the scan.)
I wanted to do a little tribute to commemorate him ten years on, but wasn’t able to finish in time for the exact date due to being so busy (it’s the time of year!). I did manage to complete this 10 x 8 painting on canvas today though, so I wanted to share it and remember a remarkable whale.
(Please do not delete text if reblogging. Thank you!)
www.jenrichardsart.com

jenrichardsart:

Keiko wasn’t the whale that sparked my interest in orcas – that happened before Free Willy came out – but he was the one whose story I followed very closely for almost a decade. I had half a dozen VHS tapes on which I’d record anything concerning orcas that would come up on TV, whether it was a documentary, a news clip, or a film snippet; folders were packed with newspaper clippings and magazine articles. At the time, most of that news coverage was of Keiko’s extensive rehabilitation and release. It was easy to fall in love with this huge, endearing animal whose life became far more fascinating than a wistful movie plot. Like so many others around the world, I felt like I was with Keiko for every challenge and success along his journey: every transfer, every “ocean walk,” every opportunity to interact with his own species, every return to humans. Though I can’t begin to imagine the heartbreak those that worked with him felt when he died, I was devastated. That was the 12th December 2003. I painted a picture of him a few days later. (I’ve unfortunately lost the scan.)

I wanted to do a little tribute to commemorate him ten years on, but wasn’t able to finish in time for the exact date due to being so busy (it’s the time of year!). I did manage to complete this 10 x 8 painting on canvas today though, so I wanted to share it and remember a remarkable whale.

(Please do not delete text if reblogging. Thank you!)

www.jenrichardsart.com

(via bathe-the-whales)

22:31   4-22-14   159 notes

books0977:

Allégorie de la Musique (1896). Paul François Quinsac (French, 1858-1932). Oil on canvas.

books0977:

Allégorie de la Musique (1896). Paul François Quinsac (French, 1858-1932). Oil on canvas.

(via exites)

22:02   4-22-14   414 notes

21:33   4-22-14   4,078 notes

21:04   4-22-14   26 notes